European project combats climate change with wood buildings

European project combats climate change with wood buildings

he construction sector is one of Europe’s largest CO2-emmittors. A European innovation project targets reduction of CO2 emissions through increased use of wood for multi-story buildings. ’We want to take multi-story wood buildings mainstream’ says project coordinator.

Widespread construction of multi-story wood buildings could significantly reduce CO2 emissions from the construction sector. An international cooperation wants the construction industry to rediscover wood as the ideal building material. A consortium, consisting of 21 partners has been awarded funding by Horizon 2020 to deliver a pan European innovation project ’Build-in-Wood’. The 10 million € project has the objective of significantly increasing the use of wood for multi-story buildings.

Our goal is simple. To make wood the common choice of material for construction of multi-story buildings. We’re not trying to create the world’s tallest wood building, we’re trying to maximise our impact by targeting wood-based building systems for 3-10 storey buildings, where European demand is highest, says project coordinator Niels Morsing from the Danish Technological Institute.

The construction sector is one of Europe’s largest CO2 contributors. Years of targeted legislation has significantly reduced emissions from operational energy of European buildings, however the significant contribution from the production of building materials and the building process has gone below the radar. But there are easy fruits to harvest in terms of CO2 emission reductions by increasing the use of wood in construction. Trees absorb CO2 from the atmosphere when they grow and store it in the form of wood. When we build with wood we can use our buildings and cities as large carbon storing devices.